Last October, we reported here how the Eleventh Circuit in Muransky v. Godiva had broken with other circuits regarding the application of the Supreme Court’s opinion in Spokeo v. Robins. Last week, the Eleventh Circuit sua sponte vacated its October 2018 opinion and issued a new opinion.

Continue Reading Eleventh Circuit sua sponte vacates prior Spokeo opinion

In Obduskey v. McCarthy & Holthus, LLP, the United States Supreme Court unanimously held the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act does not apply to a law firm conducting a nonjudicial foreclosure.

While the law firm prevailed in Obduskey, the Court’s opinion suggested several circumstances in which the law firm might have been subject

A recent Supreme Court decision may allow defendants to avoid lawsuits in distant courts that have little or no connection to the lawsuit, especially in cases (such as mass actions) where the claims of out-of-state plaintiffs are joined with those of in-state plaintiffs.  In Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. v. Superior Court of California, San Francisco Cty., — U.S. —, 137 S. Ct. 1773, 1775 (2017), the Supreme Court held that a California state court did not have personal jurisdiction to adjudicate claims against a drug company, at least for the plaintiffs who were not California residents and who had not alleged a connection between the alleged injury and the state of California.  While law school civil procedure professors spend weeks covering personal jurisdiction, the defense rarely appears in real-world practice because most plaintiffs’ attorneys are smart enough to avoid a fight over jurisdiction.  Thus, defendants may give this defense only cursory consideration at the outset of a lawsuit.  Following Bristol-Myers, defendants may want to more carefully consider the personal jurisdiction defense as a way to avoid litigation in a hostile forum.

Continue Reading Defendants should consider personal jurisdiction defense following Supreme Court decision, especially when the claims of out-of-state plaintiffs are joined with those of in-state plaintiffs.