Alabama law permits the creation of public corporations known as “improvement districts,” which can then issue bonds that are similar to bonds issued by a municipal corporation. These bonds can be used to finance improvements within the district. In Aliant Bank v. Four Star Investments, Inc., the Alabama Supreme Court allowed claims against the directors of one of these improvement districts to go forward despite claims of immunity. The Court also allowed certain fraud claims to go forward against the directors as well as other related individuals and entities. In addition to authorizing lenders to bring suit, the opinion also serves as a strong reminder that lenders should monitor their collateral and promptly investigate any signs of misconduct.


Continue Reading Alabama Supreme Court: Lender can sue directors of a public improvement district for negligence, breach of fiduciary duty

The Eleventh Circuit recently held in Nicklaw v. CitiMortgage, Inc.(No. 15-14216) that a plaintiff lacks standing to sue a creditor where the plaintiff merely alleges that the creditor failed to timely record a mortgage satisfaction, as it is statutorily required to do, but does not allege any additional concrete injury.

Continue Reading Citing Spokeo, Eleventh Circuit Rejects Class Action Over Late Mortgage Satisfaction Recordation, Holding Plaintiff Had Not Alleged Concrete Injury-In-Fact Due to Statutory Violation

In Sims v. JPMC Specialty Mortgage, LLC, No. 2150437, a borrower had been involved in two previous lawsuits arising out of a mortgage servicer’s foreclosure upon the borrower’s property. The servicer obtained summary judgment in the trial court based on the doctrine of res judicata.  The Alabama Court of Civil Appeals reversed, finding that genuine issues of material fact precluded summary judgment based on res judicata.

Continue Reading Alabama Court of Civil Appeals reverses summary judgment granted in favor of mortgage servicer based on res judicata defense.

The Alabama Supreme Court recently held in Ex parte Arvest Bank, that an unexecuted judgment lien against the property interest of one joint tenant does not sever a joint tenancy with the right of survivorship, thereby extinguishing the lienholder’s rights in the property when that joint tenant dies.

Continue Reading Joint Tenancy Lienholders Should Timely Execute on Judgment Liens in Order to Avoid Losing Property Interest

Few issues involving the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) are more hotly contested than whether filing a proof of claim on a time-barred debt violates the FDCPA. In bankruptcy, creditors have a right to file proofs of claim outlining the debt owed to them by the bankrupt debtor. In some instances, the statute of

In Gloor v. BancorpSouth Bank, No. 2140914 (Ala. Civ. App. April 1, 2016), the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals held that a creditor may revive and collect on an unpaid judgment that is older than 10 years, further clarifying a significant protection afforded to financial institutions charged with recovering past due amounts owed by judgment debtors.

Continue Reading Alabama Court of Civil Appeals affirms revival of 11-year old uncollected judgment based on affidavit testimony of creditor’s corporate officer with knowledge of debtor’s nonpayment