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The federal courts have been struggling for several years to clarify Article III standing law. Is it enough that a plaintiff satisfy the elements of a federal consumer protection statute? Is it enough that a data breach have happened? Or, must the plaintiff show that they have actually been damaged or that there is a substantial risk that they will be damaged? On October 28, 2020 the Eleventh Circuit handed down a sharply split en banc decision applying the U.S. Supreme Court’s Article III standing decision, Spokeo Inc. v. Robins, 136 S. Ct. 1540 (2016). The court held directly held that it is not enough that a statutory violation have occurred. Even though defendant Godiva Chocolates violated the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (“FACTA”), the Court held that the named class plaintiff lacked standing to bring the action because he did not allege any concrete injury.

Continue Reading Giving Teeth to Article III Standing Requirements in the Eleventh Circuit.

In a flurry of new class actions filed on behalf of unhappy small business owners, banks are facing suits alleging they unlawfully prioritized processing large loans under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) over smaller ones. Two parallel class actions were filed on April 19, 2020 and April 20, 2020 in California federal court accusing two large banks of reshuffling loan applications instead of processing them on a first-come, first-served basis to purportedly maximize the banks’ profit from the federal loan program. Another similar class action was filed in state court in Texas. The class plaintiffs include a frozen yogurt shop, an auto body shop and a flooring company among others.

Continue Reading Banks Beware: New Class Actions Alleging Banks Prioritized Large PPP Loans Over Smaller Ones